“Et tu, Mrs. McCarthy?”

By Bridgit McCarthy Bridgit McCarthy teaches third grade at New Dimensions, a public charter school in Morganton, North Carolina. Today in social studies, we assassinated Julius Caesar! My students’ faces registered shock, sadness, and a sprinkling of outrage, all nicely mixed with understanding. How mean!  Why would anyone kill their ally? I bet his wife…

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For Equity, for Kids, for Democracy—Let’s Create a Model District with a Well-Rounded Curriculum

Last week, I shared that the Core Knowledge Foundation is seeking a courageous district to partner with. A district that will push back against pressure to teach to the test, and instead commit to a content-rich, coherent, cumulative curriculum (including art, music, civics, and all the other important things that are too often neglected) in…

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Wanted: A District with the Courage to Close the Gap

I’m not one to do New Year’s resolutions—why set myself up for failure? But I do like to take a little time over the holidays to reflect on the year. For me, the highlight of 2014 was attending the Politico 50 reception with E. D. Hirsch, who shared the No. 8 spot on Politico’s list…

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Exceeding Expectations in Louisiana

By Debbie Jenkins Debbie Jenkins is the elementary curriculum and instruction supervisor of Bogalusa City Schools in Louisiana. This post originally appeared on Amplify’s Viewpoints.  Learn more about Bogalusa City Schools’ use of Core Knowledge in this video. There’s an old Barbara Mandrell song that goes, “I was country when country wasn’t cool.” Similarly, I like…

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New Leaders in Literacy

It used to be that advocating for building broad knowledge with a content-rich curriculum in the early grades was a lonely enterprise. No more! Whether it’s the focus on the early word gap or the Common Core’s explanation of literacy or the moral universe bending toward justice, knowledge is finally getting its due. New reports…

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Reading Test Developers Call Knowledge a Source of Bias

You might expect to see a headline like this in the Onion, but you won’t. The Onion can’t run it because it isn’t just ironic—it’s 100% true. A few years ago, a researcher at one of the big testing companies told me that when developing a reading comprehension test, knowledge is a source of bias….

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