From now through May 6th, it’s National Children’s Book Week. This long-running initiative of the Children’s Book Council promotes literacy with events at schools, libraries, and bookstores celebrating books for children and teens. Throughout this week (and beyond!), it’s a great time to revisit favorite classics like Charlotte’s Web and Little Women, and also an opportunity to explore the wide range of voices and perspectives in works by contemporary authors.

Where to begin? You might start with recent Newberry and Caldecott winners, or peruse the titles selected by the Association for Library Service to Children as this year’s Notable Children’s Books.

Here at the Core Knowledge Foundation, we’d like to share with you the works of an author suggested to us by teachers in the Core Knowledge network, Jacqueline Woodson. Ms. Woodson has authored eighteen books in genres varying from picture books to young adult fiction to poetry. Ms. Woodson’s work has garnered many awards, including the Coretta Scott King Award. She is a four-time Newberry Honor Medalist. Ms. Woodson has also recently been named the sixth National Ambassador for Young People’s Literature for 2018-2019.

Children in grades K-5 might enjoy The Other Side (2000), a picture book that tells the story of two girls, Clover and Annie, who live in a segregated town and use the power of friendship to bring down the barriers separating them. In another picture book, Each Kindness (2012), the narrator, Chloe, is unkind to the new girl at school, Maya. When Maya stops coming to school, Chloe realizes, through a lesson taught by her teacher, that she lost the opportunity to make a new friend. The book dramatizes the ripple effect of acts of kindness.

In Brown Girl Dreaming (2014), a “memoir in free verse,” Ms. Woodson describes growing up in the 1960s and 1970s as an African American girl in Greenville, South Carolina and Brooklyn, New York. In these narrative poems, Ms. Woodson recalls how she never felt quite at home in either place, and lets us see through her eyes her growing awareness of the Civil Rights Movement.

Brown Girl Dreaming, suitable for grades four and up, will soon be the focus of a new Language Arts unit to be developed by the Core Knowledge Foundation as part of a forthcoming initiative to expand our offering of Core Knowledge Language Arts (CKLA) materials offered for free download on our website. An OER (Open Educational Resources) Teacher Guide to accompany Brown Girl Dreaming is currently under development and will soon be added to our offering of Grade 4 CKLA units.

To learn more about Jacqueline Woodson and her other works, check out her website. And you can learn more about National Children’s Book Week and find activities that you can do with your students here.

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